Can you imagine going to the bank and not having any idea what you need to do or how to manage your finances

Can you imagine going to the bank and not having any idea what you need to do or how to manage your finances. This will cause a huge disaster in your life, and you will be bankrupt within hours.

Can you imagine going to the bank and not having any idea what you need to do or how to manage your finances

Reflection Log (4 points): Students will maintain a typed journal to reflect on topics discussed and
Readings/homework as assigned. Each entry is worth 4 points and should be at least a half page. Include some of the following:

1. Identify the topic

2. Your personal thoughts, reflections on the topic

3. Examples of real-life relevant applications for deaf students/experiences/observations

4. Connections to content area and literacy (reading and writing)

5. Identify sources (articles, websites, etc) that were use

For this last Reflection Log, please focus on Math, and respond to at least two of these areas:

* How do you use math in your everyday life?

Baking and cooking requires some mathematical skill as well. Every ingredient has to be measured and sometimes you need to multiply or divide to get the exact amount you need. Whatever you do in the kitchen requires math. Even just using the stove is basic math skills in action.

Can you imagine going to the bank and not having any idea what you need to do or how to manage your finances. This will cause a huge disaster in your life, and you will be bankrupt within hours.

* What are your students’ experiences with math in and outside of the classroom? Include reviewing the IEPs of 2 students specifically the students’ math present levels and goals.

If possible, start using maths language in problems from an early age so that the children’s understanding can become deeply embedded.

Ask the children a mathematics based question every day by incorporating it into their play: “how many dolls are there in the class?” or “are you going to share those cakes with your friends?”

As deaf children can’t rely on what they hear, the use of visuals becomes more necessary. Deaf children may focus on concrete materials a bit longer than hearing children — using fingers, counters, and blocks for example.

Like other children, deaf children prefer to choose their own method to solve problems. There are a number of methods you can use: number line, column methods, drawing counters, dots. Always have a white board and a board pen to hand so that they can practice.

In the end, it’s important to remember that deaf children are all different. They have different hearing levels, different access to language, different language needs and, possibly, other needs too. All of these tips can be used to support deaf children in developing their mathematical language, but always work with them to define what suits them best.

I teach multi-grade level students. Most of their IEP goals are when given four computational problems commonly introduced in math textbooks at second and third grade level, Bina will compute the correct answers for at least three of the four problems.
* What type of manipulative, textbooks and other resources do you have in your classroom or have access to?

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/
https://www.mathsisfun.com/numbers/index.html

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