Case Study “Arizona Grants Manager on the Spot” by Gary Crum, Ph.D. Your county in rural Arizona has a major, chronic social problem

Arizona Grants Manager on the Spot

 

Case Study: Gary Crum, Ph.D.’s “Arizona Grants Manager on the Spot” A significant portion of the migrant worker population lives in your county in rural Arizona, depending on the crops that are ready for planting and harvesting each month. However, almost no local healthcare providers are willing to treat them because many of the workers are undocumented or otherwise ineligible for government assistance. Some people have some insurance coverage, but the payments aren’t high enough to entice many doctors to treat them. This is known as underinsurance. In addition, there aren’t many nearby physicians.

Thus, the county health department, on behalf of the local government, has submitted applications for two significant grants. The first is a federal building grant, while the second is a personnel or operations grant from a regional charity organization. With the help of these two grants, the county plans to construct a new clinic and launch a clinic program to meet the medical requirements of its underprivileged migrant workers. These are the details of the multimillion-dollar project:

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A. Federal funds will be provided across three payments, spaced out over 18 months from the funding date. 1. Building a 6,000-square-foot clinic with a modest parking lot, as well as obtaining lab supplies and an X-ray machine

B. The county will get five annual payments from a local foundation, starting 15 months after the federal funds are received, to help put employees and equipment in place as soon as feasible after the facility is expected to be constructed. 1. Hiring of four nurses (RNs and LPNs) and two primary care physicians 2. Hiring of two employees for billing and two for scheduling 3. Hiring of 1.2 Full-Time Equivalents in Maintenance and Cleaning 4. Assistance with the costs of keeping the clinic afloat while it treats Medicaid patients who cannot afford to pay for at least the first five years of operation.

The federal monies were received, and after sending the first year’s allotment, the Foundation also committed to writing its future donations to enable the county to start hiring as necessary. The news that these two grant applications were successful has caused much celebration in the neighborhood, especially among migrant workers.

Things start out pretty nicely, and after many months, the building project is almost finished. All necessary staff members are hired, quit their careers, and relocate to the area. The migrant laborers’ new day is about to dawn, according to the local newspaper.

Then the worst happens. The nearly built facility was struck by a tornado at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, before the clinic was to be finished and open for business. No one was hurt, but the building is entirely destroyed.

Although there is insurance to reconstruct the structure, it will take another 18 months or so for the clinic project to advance to the same stage as before the tornado struck.

The county seat is roughly 20 miles distant, and you, the grants manager, learn of the storm and its effects almost immediately. You must deal with the following problems right away:

1. The building is destroyed, the federal funds are 98% gone, and until the insurance is obtained and the project is restarted from scratch, it is obviously impossible to provide a project report indicating “completion” to the federal agency. You could be up to two years late with respect to the initially agreed-upon completion date.

2. The numerous staff members who have been hired and recruited are already in the region (just one person hired already resides nearby), ready to start working in the next week, but they lack insurance to cover their specific unlucky circumstances. They do not have civil servant protections because their probationary periods have not ended; thus, there is no legal requirement to locate them other employment or to offer them any financial assistance.

3. Even though the local foundation has more of a “do-gooder” mindset than the federal agency might, it can be difficult to convince them to help you much more given their limited resources. Additionally, the government grant money has already been distributed, and you have insurance to cover the clinic expenses.

The county officials are handling several calls from the media, the distress of the community, and calls from anxious workers who have just learned that their new workplace won’t be ready next week or any time soon. The county manager calls you as the grants manager at noon and asks you to offer her and her top management team a specific suggestion for what needs to be done within four hours.

The scenario and instructions are also supplied.

Term paper: Case Study

Case Study: Gary Crum, Ph.D.’s “Arizona Grants Manager on the Spot”

A significant portion of the migrant worker population lives in your county in rural Arizona, depending on the crops that are ready for planting and harvesting each month. However, almost no local healthcare providers are willing to treat them because many of the workers are undocumented or otherwise ineligible for government assistance. Some people have some insurance coverage, but the payments aren’t high enough to entice many doctors to treat them. This is known as underinsurance. In addition, there aren’t many nearby physicians.

 

Thus, the county health department, on behalf of the local government, has submitted applications for two significant grants. The first is a federal building grant, while the second is a personnel or operations grant from a regional charity organization. With the help of these two grants, the county plans to construct a new clinic and launch a clinic program to meet the medical requirements of its underprivileged migrant workers. These are the details of the multimillion-dollar project:

 

With federal funds to be provided across three payments spaced out over 18 months starting from the funding date:
Building a 6,000-square-foot clinic with a modest parking lot, as well as obtaining lab supplies and an X-ray machine

 

With local foundation monies distributed to the county in five annual instalments (to begin 15 months after the federal funds are received to allow the staff and equipment to be in place as soon as possible after the building is anticipated to be finished):
hiring of four nurses (RNs and LPNs) and two primary care physicians
Two billing clerks and two secretaries/scheduling clerks will be hired.
Recruitment of maintenance and cleaning staff (1.2 full-time equivalents)
support for the costs associated with keeping the clinic afloat while it accepts Medicaid patients with low incomes and no insurance for at least the first five years of operation.

 

The federal monies were received, and after sending the first year’s allotment, the Foundation also committed to writing its future donations to enable the county to start hiring as necessary. The news that these two grant applications were successful has caused much celebration in the neighborhood, especially among migrant workers.

 

Things start out pretty nicely, and after many months, the building project is almost finished. All necessary staff members are hired, quit their careers, and relocate to the area. The migrant laborers’ new day is about to dawn, according to the local newspaper.

 

Then the worst happens. The nearly built facility was struck by a tornado at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, before the clinic was to be finished and open for business. No one was hurt, but the building is entirely destroyed.

 

Although there is insurance to reconstruct the structure, it will take another 18 months or so for the clinic project to advance to the same stage as before the tornado struck.

 

The county seat is roughly 20 miles distant, and you, the grants manager, learn of the storm and its effects almost immediately. You must deal with the following problems right away:

 

The building is destroyed, the government funds are 98% spent, and until the insurance is paid and the project is restarted from scratch, it is evident that no project report of “completion” can be sent to the federal agency. You could be up to two years late with respect to the initially agreed-upon completion date.

 

There is no insurance to cover the bad circumstances of the numerous staff members who have been hired and recruited and who are already arriving in the area to start working in the next week (just one person hired already resides nearby). They do not have civil servant protections because their probationary periods have not ended; thus, there is no legal requirement to locate them other employment or to offer them any financial assistance.

 

Although the local foundation has more of a “do-gooder” attitude than the federal agency might, it may be difficult to convince them to help you much more given their limited financial resources. Additionally, the government grant money has already been distributed, and you have insurance to cover the clinic expenses.

 

The county officials are handling several calls from the media, the distress of the community, and calls from anxious workers who have just learned that their new workplace won’t be ready next week or any time soon. The county manager calls you as the grants manager at noon and asks you to offer her and her top management team a specific suggestion for what needs to be done within four hours.

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