HAS THE INTERNET SERVED THE PURPOSE FOR WHICH THIS NEW MEDIUM WAS INVENTED?

Has the Internet achieved the goals for which it was created?

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examining the reading list

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LIBRARY LIST
Purchase recommendations for students:
M. Castells. The Rise of the Network Society, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 2010 editions.
Essential
M. Castells. Communication Power (2011) Oxford: OUP
The hybrid media system: politics and power, by A. Chadwick, Oxford: OUP, 2013.
Murphy, M. MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts (2010), “Networks and states: the global politics of Internet governance.”
Gibson, R. K., Oates, S., and Owen, D. M. (2006), London: Routledge, The Internet and politics: citizens, voters, and activists
Recommended
M. Castells. (2012), Cambridge: Polity, Networks of fury and hope: social movements in the Internet era
A. Chadwick. (2006), Oxford: Oxford University Press, “Internet Politics: States, Citizens, and New Communication Technologies.”
S. Oates. Revolution Stalled: The Political Limits of the Internet in Post-Soviet Space, Oxford: OUP, 2013.
J. Stromer-Galley. Presidential campaigning in the Internet Age, 2014, OUP, New York
Cheung, Tai Ming; Reveron, Derek S.; Lindsay, Jon R. (2015), New York: Oxford University Press, “China and cybersecurity: espionage, strategy, and politics in the digital domain”
Background
N. Akhavan. (2013), “Electronic Iran: the Cultural Politics of an Online Evolution,” Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ
M. Castells. (2001), Oxford: Oxford University Press, The Internet Galaxy: Reflections on the Internet, Business, and Society.
Moolana, H. In 1997, Sage published Global Information and World Politics: New Frontiers in International Relations in London.
Franklin, M. 2013; New York: OUP; Digital Dilemmas: Power, Resistance, and the Internet
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Philip N. (2010), Information Technology and Political Islam: The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy, Oxford: OUP
One Seminar. Internet-related global politics
An introduction to the study of the global politics of the Internet is given in this session.
Recommended reading
J. D. Aronson. The Communications and Internet Revolution (2001), in J. and Smith, S. (eds), The Globalization of World Politics, Oxford: OUP, second edition, pp. 540–58.
M. Castells. Social movements in the Internet age: Networks of outrage and optimism, Cambridge: Polity, 2012. “Network minds, creating meaning, contesting power,” begins the chapter.
M. Castells. (2001), Oxford: Oxford University Press, The Internet Galaxy: Reflections on the Internet, Business, and Society. Chapter Opening: “The message is in the network.”
E. Gilboa. Journal of Communication, 52(4), 731–748 (2002), “Global Communication and Foreign Policy,”
Moolana, H. Global Information, and World Politics: New Frontiers in International Relations, London: Sage (1997). [Books 1, 2, and 3]
Workshop 2. The Revolution in Global Information and Communications
This section’s objective is to evaluate the development of the global information and communications revolution historically and to pinpoint the essential components of the contemporary digital media industry. The growth of the Internet will receive special consideration.
Consider these issues:
1) Describe how the global information and communications industry has evolved and what effects it has had in relation to a specific network (such as the telegraph, telephone, radio, television, or Internet).
2) How do you think the information age should be described? Describe with reference to the field of digital media (such as the Internet, mobile communications, and digital TV).
3. Has the internet altered the world that we are aware of?
Recommended reading
M. Castells. Lessons from the History of the Internet, Chapter 1 (2001), The Internet Galaxy: Reflections on the Internet, Business, and Society
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Dai, X. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2000, “The Digital Revolution and Governance.” Chapters 6 and 7
Dai, X. (1996), Oxford: Pergamon, “Corporate Strategy, Public Policy, and New Technologies.” Chapter Four
J. Hills. (1991), London: Greenwood Press, “The Democracy Gap: The Politics of Information and Communication Technologies in the United States and Europe.”
Leener, B. A Brief History of the Internet, by et al. (2000), is available online at http://www.isoc.org/internet/history/brief.shtml.
B. Parker. 2005, London: Sage, “Introduction to Globalization & Business: Relationships and Responsibilities.” Globalization and Technologies, Chapter 11, pp. 320–45. [If you want to buy this book, get in touch with Waterstone.]
Stephen Saxby published The Age of Information: The Past Development and the Future Significance of Computing and Communications in 1990. Macmillan published it in London.
Leener, B. A Brief History of the Internet, by et al. (2000), online at http://www.isoc.org/internet/history/brief.shtml
J. Slevin. (2000), Cambridge: Polity Press, The Internet and Society, Chapter 2 on “The Rise of the Internet,” pp. 27–54.
B. Winston. (1998), London: Routledge, “Media Technology and Society: A History: From the Telegraph to the Internet.” [Buy this book if you’re curious about the historical developments and revolutions in media and communications technologies!]
Using the Internet as a research tool is a practical study skill.
If you want to read more, search online. Find additional historical records, particularly on the Internet, digital TV, and 3G (third-generation mobile communications). Make a list of your main discoveries, and then let the class know where you got the information. Make a brief overview of the documents that are the most pertinent and distribute the URLs for the relevant web pages.
Workshop 3. A New Medium: The Internet
The effects of the Internet have received a lot of attention. But how significant is the Internet, and what effects does it have on how we see the environment in which we live? This section evaluates the Internet’s acceptance as a new force for economic improvement and the Internet’s acceptance as a new communication medium, both of which are being questioned more frequently. This session focuses on the Internet as an emerging new medium and how it affects conventional media.
Tasks and Questions:
1) What qualities does the Internet have as a tool for political communication? How does the Internet differ from traditional media as a new medium? Describe with regard to email correspondence and
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the WWW, or the World Wide Web. Every student must create a case study regarding a well-known Internet portal (such as www.yahoo.com, www.microsoft.com, www.sina.com, or another portal you are familiar with).
2) How has the internet affected conventional print media? Present a case study on a daily newspaper as your response (read the paper in print and online, then compare the two; for example, try The Guardian at guardian.co.uk or The Times at timesonline.co.uk).
3) Will the internet alter the way TV broadcasting operates or the other way around? Give an example using the BBC (www.bbc.co.uk) as your source.
Recommended reading
A. Bechmann. likewise Lomborg, S. Mapping actor roles in social media: Diverse viewpoints on value creation in user involvement theories, New Media & Society, 15(5) 765781 (2013)
M. Castells. Communication Power (2011) Oxford: OUP. “Communication in the Digital Age,” Chapter 2
Collin, R. Murroni, C. (1996), Cambridge: Polity Press, “New Media, New Policies: Media and Communications Strategies for the Future.”
Hauben, M. Hauben, R. (1997), Netizens, Los Alamitos: IEEE Computer Society Press, Chapter 1: “The Net and Netizens: The Impact of the Internet Has on People’s Lives,” pp. 3-34; Chapter 13: “The Effects of the Net on the Professional News Media,” pp. 222–40.
D. Hutchison. Technology Chance, Fate, and Choice is discussed in Chapter 4 of Media Policy: An Introduction by Blackwell, Oxford, 1999, pp. 49–66.
Fractal Dreams: New Media in Social Context, edited by Jon Dovery, London: Lawrence & Wishart, 1996.
Global media and communication policy, published in 2011 by Palgrave Macmillan in Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire
S. Kruikemeier. European Journal of Communication, 28(1) 5366, et al. (2013), “Getting closer: The effects of personalized and interactive online political communication.”
Johnston, T. Communication practices before and after the Internet: Internet, society, and culture, London: Bloomsbury, 2013.
S. Taipale. Investigating the direct and moderating impacts of gender on Internet use, online newspaper reading, and printed newspaper reading in Finland, European Journal of Communication, 28(1) 518, 5-18 (2013).
Schoenbach, K., and Trilling, D. European Journal of Communication, 28(1) 35-51, “Skipping Current Affairs: The Non-Users of Online and Offline News,” (2013)
The Network Society: Social Aspects of New Media by Jan van Dijk, translated by L. Spoorenberg, Sage, London.
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UK Communications White Paper, which may be read by using an internet search engine.
Meeting 4. Theoretical Perspectives on Internet Politics
Reviewing the most often referenced theoretical viewpoints on new information and communications technologies (ICTs) in general and the Internet in particular is the main goal of this session.
Consider these issues:
1) Recap the main ideas of the theories relating to the information society.
2) Do you accept Alvin Toffler’s “waves theory”?
3) What does “the network society” entail?
4) In your opinion, which theory best captures the social implications of the Internet?
Training in study skills The use of the Internet as a research tool:
Browse the online journals at the University of Hull’s Brynmor Jones Library website. Look for journal articles that discuss “Internet politics.”
Recommended reading
Manuel Castells, The Rise of the Network Society, Cambridge: Blackwell Publishers, 1996 and 2000 editions.
The Informational City: Information Technology, Economic Restructuring, and the Urban-Regional Process by Manuel Castells was published in 1991 by Basil Blackwell in Oxford.
The Information Society: A Retrospective View by Herbert Dordick and Georgette Wang was published in 1993 by Sage Publications in London.
, C. as well as N. Dyer-Witheford. Karl Marx at Internet Studies (2013), New Media & Society, 15(5) 782796
Charles Leadbeater, “Living on Thin Air: The New Economy,” Viking, London, 1999.
Code and Other Laws in the Cyberspace by Lawrence Lessig, New York: Basic Books (1999).
The Information Society: Issues and Illusions, by David Lyon, was published in 1988 by Polity Press in Cambridge.
McPhail, T. Oxford: Blackwell, 2006. Global communication: theories, stakeholders, and trends
… Mansell, R.E. The New Telecommunications: A Political Economy of Network Evolution was published by Sage in 1993 in London.
Heather Menzies, Whose Brave New World? 1996. The New Economy and the Information Highway, Toronto: Between the Lines.
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Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy by Carl Shapiro and Hal Varian was published in 1999 by Harvard Business School Press in Boston, Massachusetts.
The Internet Edge: Social, Legal, and Technological Challenges for a Networked World by Mark Stefik was published in 1999 by the MIT Press in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
A. Toffler. The Third Wave, London: Pan Books (1981).
Theories of the Information Society by Frank Webster, London: Routledge, 1995.
The Network Society: Social Aspects of New Media by Jan van Dijk, translated by L. Spoorenberg, Sage, London.
Session 5. Internet usage and world trade
The formula of one media (the Internet) and one technology (digital) for the entire world seems to be more and more indicative of the information era. The impact of the Internet on the process of globalization is evaluated in this session.
Consider these issues:
1) Can the Internet be considered a worldwide media, and if so, in what sense(s) and to what extent?
2) Has the concept of geography as we know it been altered by the Internet?
3) Does the Internet aid in the democratization of the world?
4) What conclusions are possible about the transnational exchange of knowledge and communication?
Which value—westernization/Americanization or multiculturalism—does the Internet promote?
Recommended reading
M. Castells. Communal Heavens: Identity and Meaning in the Network Society is discussed in Chapter 1 of The Power of Identity by Blackwell, Oxford, 1997, pp. 5-67.
Global Transformations: Politics, Economics, and Culture, edited by David Held, Anthony McGrew, David Goldblatt, and Jonathan Perraton, Cambridge: Polity Press, 1999.
Grahame Thompson and Paul Hirst (1996). The world economy and the potential for governance in relation to globalization, Cambridge: Polity Press.
In Howard, P. N. (2010), Information Technology and Political Islam: The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy, Oxford Scholarship Online. [ebook]
Stephen J. Lukasik. Protecting the Global Information Commons was published in Telecommunications Policy 24 (6-7) (2000): 519–531.
Matthews, Jessica T. Power Shift, Foreign Affairs 76 (1), 50–66 (1997).
McDowell and Steinberg P. A spatial constructivist perspective on global communication and the post-statism of cyberspace, Review of International Political Economy, May 2003, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 196-221(26)
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I. Volkmer. ‘Universalism and Particularism: The Problem of Cultural Sovereignty and Global Information Flow’ (1997), in B. Kahin, B. Nesson, C. Borders in Cyberspace, edited by MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, pp. 48–83.
Session 6. The State and the Internet
How significant is the nation-state in the information age, given the rise of the Internet as a transnational medium? Is the nation-state still capable of governing in the digital era? Or are there legitimate reasons for national Internet regulations?
Consider these issues:
1) Is the nation-state on the verge of extinction thanks to the Internet?
2) Is it possible for a nation-state to lawfully and successfully govern the Internet?
3) Discuss government regulation of the Internet using a case study of a specific nation.
Recommended reading
Barrington, N. (1996), The State of the Cybernation: Cultural, Political, and Economic Implications of the Internet, London: Kogan Page, Chapter 5 on ‘Legislative and Regulatory Issues,’ pp. 161-207; Chapter 6 on ‘Future Potential,’ pp. 208-29.
M. Castells. Communication Power (2011) Oxford: OUP. Chapter One
M. Castells. A Powerless State? Is Chapter 5 of The Power of Identity, published by Blackwell in Oxford in 1997., pages 243–308; Chapter 6, “Informational Politics and the Crisis of Democracy,” pages 309–53.
Dai, X. Google, New Political Economy, 12(3), 433-442 (2007).
Lordwin, M. Cyber Rights: Defending Free Expression in the Digital Age, New York: Time Books (1998), Chapter 10 on “Courting the Future: The Communications Decency Act of 1996,” pp. 260–93
Rand, You’ve Got Dissent (2002), Available at http://www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1543/, is Chinese Dissident Use of the Internet and Beijing’s Counter-Strategies.
Sclove, R. Democracy and Technology, 1995, The Guildford Press, New York.
Thomas Bernauer and Christoph Achini published From ‘Real to ‘Virtual States? in 2000. World economic integration and its impact on governmental activity. International Relations in Europe 6 (2): 223-276.
Joseph A. Camilleri. and Jim Falk (1992). The politics of a contracting and fracturing world are discussed in The End of Sovereignty. Edward Elgar is from Aldershot, UK.
Philip G. Globalization and the Degradation of Democracy (1999). 36:1-26 in the European Journal of Political Research.
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A. Claire Cutler (1999). Placement of “Authority” in the World Political Economy. 43(1):59-81 of the International Studies Quarterly.
Electronic Money: A Challenge to the Sovereign State? by Eric Helleiner, 1998. International Affairs Journal, 51(2), 387–409.
Mehta, Dr. Censoring Cyberspace was discussed in the Asian Journal of Social Science 30(2) in 2002. 319-338
Murphy, M. (2010), Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, “Networks and states: the global politics of Internet governance.” The struggle for the Internet’s soul is discussed in Chapter I.
Reed, C. 2nd edition of Internet Law: Text and Materials, published by Cambridge University Press in 2004. [If you want to buy this book, get in touch with Waterstone.]
Rogers, G. Political Science Quarterly, 113(1): 63-89 (1998), “The Internet and Political Control in Singapore.”
The Retreat of the State: The Diffusion of Power in the World Economy, by Susan Strange, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.
7th Seminar. Internet governing internationally
The primary goal of this session is to learn more about the worldwide systems and processes that control the Internet.
The Drezner, D.W. Bring the State Back in: The Global Governance of the Internet, Political Science Quarterly 119(3): 477-498 (2004)
KWILMWACHTER, W. Telecommunications Policy 24 (6-7):553-63 (2000), “ICANN between Technical Mandate and Political Challenges.”
Murphy, M. (2010), Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, “Networks and states: The global politics of Internet governance.” [Books 1, 2, and 3]
The Battle for Internet Domain Names: Global or National TLDs?, Mueller, M. L. 22(2):89-107 in Telecommunications Policy.
Theo G. likewise Wyatt, S. Research Policy 28 (7):681-98 (1999), “Shaping Cyberspace Interpreting and Transforming the Internet.”
Mueller and van Eeten, MJG. Where is the governance in Internet governance? (2013).15(5) 720736, New Media & Society
Tasks:
Find the following groups online, then research the roles that each of them plays:
The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, also known as ICANN,
Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)
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Internet Society, or ISOC
Worldwide Web Consortium (W3C)
Consider these issues:
1) How is the Internet governed globally?
What are the principal concerns with regard to Internet governance?
3) What may be inferred from the ICANN’s past and current operations?
8th Seminar. International Politics and the Internet: The Reemergence of the States?
Consider these issues:
1) Is it reasonable to believe that the current system will restrain the Internet’s influence on global politics?
2) How well suited is the present order of world politics to administering the global Internet?
Walker, C., and Akdeniz, Y. and D. Wall. The Internet, Law and Society, edited by Harlow: Longman, 2000.
M. Castells. Lessons from the History of the Internet, Chapter 1 (2001), The Internet Galaxy: Reflections on the Internet, Business, and Society, pp. 9–35.
Ernst B. Haas. “Is there a Hole in the Whole?” by (1975). International Organization 29 (3):827-876, Knowledge, Technology, Interdependence, and the Construction of International Regimes.
B. Loader. ed. London: Routledge, 1997. “The Governance of Cyberspace: Politics, Technology, and Global Restructuring.”
Walker, S., and Lucio, M.M. (2009), “Making networks and (re)making trade union bureaucracy: a European-wide case study of trade union engagement with the Internet and networking,” New Technology, Work and Employment, 24(2), 115–130 [e-Journal]; and Trevorrow, P.
Journalist Ira C. Journal of Common Market Studies 51 (2):527-538 (1998), “The Framework for Global Electronic Commerce: A Policy Perspective.”
Murphy, M. (2010), Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, “Networks and states: The global politics of Internet governance.” 4 Chapters
European Journal of Industrial Relations, 15(2)187205 [e-journal], Pulignano, V. (2005). International Cooperation, Transnational Restructuring, and Virtual Networking in Europe.
BIGHES, R. A convention for cyberspace was published in International Affairs 86(2) 523541 in 2010.
Tasks:
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Visit the websites of any of the international organizations listed below, and then talk about how those organizations are relevant to the growth and administration of the world’s information and communications technologies.
(The ITU)
The OECD
The WTO.
4) The EU
9th Seminar. Political aspects of cyber security
This session examines the shifting power dynamics in cyberspace. It presents the fundamental query of whether it is possible to accomplish both information freedom and cyber security in the modern day.
Questions:
1) Does law enforcement face difficulties because of the Internet?
2) Has the power dynamic between citizens and the government changed as a result of the Internet?
3. Has the idea of national security evolved as a result of the Internet?
4) Whose laws should be followed while thinking about cybercrimes?
Recommended reading
Dearth, D. H., and Campen, A. D. likewise Goodden, R. T. (1996), Fairfax: AFCEA International Press, “Cyberwar: Security, Strategy, and Conflict in the Information Age.”
Goldsmith and Choucri, N. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 68(2) 7077 (2012), “Lost in Cyberspace: Harnessing the Internet, International Relations, and Global Security”
J. Guisnel. Gui Masai’s translation of Cyberwars: Espionage on the Internet was published in 1997 by Plenum Press in New York.
The Inkster, N. Survival Global Politics and Strategy, 52(4), 5566 (2010), “China in Cyberspace”
Murphy, M. (2010), Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, “Networks and states: The global politics of Internet governance.” Chapters 8 and 10
Reed, C. 2nd edition of Internet Law: Text and Materials, published by Cambridge University Press in 2004. [If you want to buy this book, get in touch with Waterstone.]
You’ve Got Dissent, Rand (2002) Available at http://www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1543/ is Chinese Dissident Use of the Internet and Beijing’s Counter-Strategies.
E. Staksrud. Online grooming legislation: A knee-jerk response to the problem?Journal of Communication, 28(2), 152167.
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Stevens,t. A Cyberwar of Ideas in 2012? Contemporary Security Policy, 33(1), 148–170; Deterrence and Norms in Cyberspace.
Site: www.cdt.org, Centre for Democracy & Technology
Website of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), eff.org
EPIC, www.epic.org, the Electronic Privacy Information Centre
The STOA report, published by the European Parliament, can be seen at http://www.statewatch.org/news/2005/may/steve-wright-stoa-rep.pdf.
10th Seminar. Cyberspace conceptualization: Internet users and the digital state
M. Castells. (2011), Communication Power, Oxford: OUP [chapter 5] [Please make sure you study this chapter before the seminar.]
M. Castells. ‘The New Public Sphere: Global Civil Society, Communication Networks, and Global Governance (2008) The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science Vol. 616, Issue 1, 78-93
McDowell and Steinberg, P. A spatial constructivist perspective on global communication and the post-statism of cyberspace was published in Review of International Political Economy 10(2) in 2003.
11th Seminar. What Can We Learn from the Edward Snowden Scandal?
M. Castells. (2011), “Communication Power,” Oxford: OUP [Please read the book’s conclusion].
Tasks:
1. Find media coverage of Edward Snowden by using a search engine on the web.
2. Respond to the following inquiries:
a) Why do states monitor electronic communications and information?
b) What conclusions about Internet governance can be taken from the Edward Snowden scandal?

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